In the Devil’s Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692

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Vintage #ad - Award-winning historian mary Beth Norton reexamines the Salem witch trials in this startlingly original, meticulously researched, and utterly riveting study. In 1692 the people of Massachusetts were living in fear, and not solely of satanic afflictions. Meanwhile the colony’s leaders, defensive about their own failure to protect the frontier, pondered how God’s people could be suffering at the hands of savages.

Horrifyingly violent indian attacks had all but emptied the northern frontier of settlers, and many traumatized refugees—including the main accusers of witches—had fled to communities like Salem. Struck by the similarities between what the refugees had witnessed and what the witchcraft “victims” described, many were quick to see a vast conspiracy of the Devil in league with the French and the Indians threatening New England on all sides.

In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692 #ad - By providing this essential context to the famous events, and by casting her net well beyond the borders of Salem itself, Norton sheds new light on one of the most perplexing and fascinating periods in our history.

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The Devil in the Shape of a Woman: Witchcraft in Colonial New England

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - The case of ann cole, who was "taken with very strange Fits, " fueled an outbreak of witchcraft accusations in Hartford a generation before the notorious events at Salem. More than three hundred years later, the question "Why?" still haunts us. This is not just another book about witchcraft. Edmund S. Morgan, a servant, yale universityconfessing to "familiarity with the devils, " Mary Johnson, was executed by Connecticut officials in 1648.

A pioneer work in…the sexual structuring of society. Why were these and other women likely witches—vulnerable to accusations of witchcraft and possession? Carol F. Karlsen reveals the social construction of witchcraft in seventeenth-century New England and illuminates the larger contours of gender relations in that society.

The Devil in the Shape of a Woman: Witchcraft in Colonial New England #ad - A wealthy boston widow, Ann Hibbens was hanged in 1656 for casting spells on her neighbors.

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Salem Possessed: Social Origins of Witchcraft

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Harvard University Press #ad - The stark immediacy of what happened in 1692 has obscured the complex web of human passion which climaxed in the Salem witch trialsFrom rich and varied sources—many neglected and unknown—Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum give us a picture of the people and events more intricate and more fascinating than any other in the massive literature.

. Not simply a dramatic and isolated event, the shifting role of the church, the Salem outbreak has wider implications for our understanding of developments central to the American experience: the disintegration of Puritanism, the problems besetting farmer and householder, the pressures of land and population in New England towns, and the powerful impact of commercial capitalism.

Salem Possessed: Social Origins of Witchcraft #ad - Tormented girls writhing in agony, stern judges meting out harsh verdicts, nineteen bodies swinging on Gallows Hill. It is a story of powerful and deeply divided families and of a community determined to establish an independent identity—beset by restraints and opposition from without and factional conflicts from within—and a minister whose obsessions helped to bring this volatile mix to the flash point.

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A Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience Pivotal Moments in American History

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Oxford University Press #ad - Engaging a range of perspectives, as well as the judges and government officials who prosecuted them--and wrestles with questions about why the Salem tragedy unfolded as it did, he looks at the key players in the outbreak--the accused witches and the people they allegedly bewitched, and why it has become an enduring legacy.

Salem in 1692 was a critical moment for the fading Puritan government of Massachusetts Bay, whose attempts to suppress the story of the trials and erase them from memory only fueled the popular imagination. Baker argues that the trials marked a turning point in colonial history from Puritan communalism to Yankee independence, from faith in collective conscience to skepticism toward moral governance.

Beginning in january 1692, salem Village in colonial Massachusetts witnessed the largest and most lethal outbreak of witchcraft in early America. The resulting salem witch trials, culminating in the execution of 19 villagers, persists as one of the most mysterious and fascinating events in American history.

Historians have speculated on a web of possible causes for the witchcraft that stated in Salem and spread across the region-religious crisis, an encephalitis outbreak, ergot poisoning, frontier war hysteria--but most agree that there was no single factor. A brilliantly told tale, a storm of witchcraft also puts Salem's storm into its broader context as a part of the ongoing narrative of American history and the history of the Atlantic World.

A Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience Pivotal Moments in American History #ad - Believing that they suffered from assaults by an invisible spirit, the community began a hunt to track down those responsible for the demonic work. Villagers--mainly young women--suffered from unseen torments that caused them to writhe, and contort their bodies, shriek, complaining of pins stuck into their flesh and of being haunted by specters.

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Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England

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Oxford University Press #ad - Now demos has revisited his original work and updated it to illustrate why these early Americans' strange views on witchcraft still matter to us today. He provides a new preface that puts forth a broader overview of witchcraft and looks at its place around the world--from ancient times right up to the present.

By investigating the surviving historical documents of over a hundred actual witchcraft cases, he vividly recreated the world of New England during the witchcraft trials and brought to light fascinating information on the role of witchcraft in early American culture. In the first edition of the bancroft Prize-winning Entertaining Satan, John Putnam Demos presented an entirely new perspective on American witchcraft.

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The Salem Witch Trials: A Day-by-Day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege

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Taylor Trade Publishing #ad - Based on over twenty years of original archival research, this history unfolds a nearly day-by-day narrative of the Salem Witch Trials as the citizens of Salem experienced the outbreak of hysteria.

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The Devil in Massachusetts: A Modern Inquiry into the Salem Witch Trials

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Papamoa Press #ad - In the end, one is pretty sure what was wrong with Cotton Mather, the august judges, and the tormented young girls. The devil in massachusetts is a vivid and compassionate reconstruction of the Salem witchcraft hysteria. One by one were brought to the gallows such diverse personalities as a decent grandmother; a rakish, pipe-smoking female tramp; a plain farmer who thought only to save his wife from molestation; a lame old man whose toothless gums did not deny expression to a very salty vocabulary.

But from the very beginning some fought the hysteria, pitting sanity against insanity, and eventually forced the community to atone for its tragic error. Medical science that day had no better explanation than “the evil eye”; and so Massachusetts was precipitated into a reign of terror that did not end until the highest in the land had been accused of witchcraft—ministers, a judge, the Governor’s lady.

The Devil in Massachusetts: A Modern Inquiry into the Salem Witch Trials #ad - Written with sly humor, much of the book reads like a novel. It stands alone in applying modern psychiatric knowledge to the witchcraft hysteria. Nearly three hundred years ago the fate of Massachusetts was delivered into the hands of a pack of young girls. This dramatic and deeply moving book combines a narrative that has the pace and excitement of a novel, a timeless portrait of bigotry and a self-righteousness, and an authentic history of the Salem witch trials.

Marion starkey has written history which illustrates the past and at the same time packs and important contemporary moral. Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.

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Six Women of Salem: The Untold Story of the Accused and Their Accusers in the Salem Witch Trials

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Da Capo Press #ad - By the end of the trials, 74 had been "afflicted, and this doesn't include the religious, 207 individuals had been accused, " 32 had officially accused their fellow neighbors, beyond the twenty who were executed and the five who perished in prison, judicial, and 255 ordinary people had been inexorably drawn into that ruinous and murderous vortex, and governmental leaders.

. All this adds up to what the Rev. And although the flood of names and detail in the history of an extraordinary event like the Salem witch trials can swamp the individual lives involved, individuals still deserve to be remembered and, in remembering specific lives, modern readers can benefit from such historical intimacy.

Six Women of Salem: The Untold Story of the Accused and Their Accusers in the Salem Witch Trials #ad - By examining the lives of six specific women, Marilynne Roach shows readers what it was like to be present throughout this horrific time and how it was impossible to live through it unchanged. Cotton mather called "a desolation of names. The individuals involved are too often reduced to stock characters and stereotypes when accuracy is sacrificed to indignation.

The story of the salem witch trials told through the lives of six womenSix Women of Salem is the first work to use the lives of a select number of representative women as a microcosm to illuminate the larger crisis of the Salem witch trials.

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Good Wives: Image and Reality in the Lives of Women in Northern New England, 1650-1750

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Vintage #ad - This enthralling work of scholarship strips away abstractions to reveal the hidden--and not always stoic--face of the "goodwives" of colonial America. In these pages we encounter the awesome burdens--and the considerable power--of a New England housewife's domestic life and witness her occasional forays into the world of men.

Painstakingly researched, lively with scandal and homely detail, Good Wives is history at its best. We see her borrowing from her neighbors, all too often, raising--and, loving her husband, mourning--her children, and even attaining fame as a heroine of frontier conflicts or notoriety as a murderess.

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Tituba, Reluctant Witch of Salem: Devilish Indians and Puritan Fantasies The American Social Experience

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NYU Press #ad - The first focuses on tituba's roots in Barbados, the second on her life in the New World. In this important book, the elusive, elaine breslaw claims to have rediscovered Tituba, mysterious, and often mythologized Indian woman accused of witchcraft in Salem in 1692 and immortalized in Arthur Miller's The Crucible.

The author emphasizes the inextricably linked worlds of the Caribbean and the North American colonies, illustrating how the Puritan worldview was influenced by its perception of possessed Indians. Reconstructing the life of the slave woman at the center of the notorious Salem witch trials, the book follows Tituba from her likely origins in South America to Barbados, forcefully dispelling the commonly-held belief that Tituba was African.

This confession, perceived as evidence of a diabolical conspiracy, was the central agent in the cataclysmic series of events that saw 19 people executed and over 150 imprisoned, including a young girl of 5. A landmark contribution to women's history and early American history, Reluctant Witch of Salem sheds new light on one of the most painful episodes in American history, Tituba, through the eyes of its most crucial participant.

Tituba, Reluctant Witch of Salem: Devilish Indians and Puritan Fantasies The American Social Experience #ad - Breslaw argues that tituba’s confession to practicing witchcraft clearly reveals her savvy and determined efforts to protect herself by actively manipulating Puritan fears. The uniquely multicultural nature of life on a seventeenth-century Barbadan sugar plantation—defined by a mixture of English, American Indian, and African ways and folklore—indelibly shaped the young Tituba's world and the mental images she brought with her to Massachusetts.

Breslaw divides Tituba’s story into two parts.

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The Salem Witch Hunt Bedford Series in History and Culture

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Bedford/St. Martin's #ad - The documents in this volume illuminate how the Puritans' worldview led them to seek a supernatural explanation for the problems vexing their community. A chronology of the witchcraft crisis, questions for consideration, and a selected bibliography round out the book's pedagogical support. More than 150 people -- primarily women -- from 24 communities were charged with witchcraft; 19 were hanged and others died in prison.

. Presented as case studies, the carefully chosen records from several specific trials offer a clear picture of the gender norms and social tensions that underlie the witchcraft accusations. This second edition continues to explore the beliefs, fears, and historical context that fueled the witch panic of 1692.

The Salem Witch Hunt Bedford Series in History and Culture #ad - In his revised introduction, richard godbeer offers coverage of the convulsive ergotism thesis advanced in the 1970s and a discussion of new scholarship on men who were accused of witchcraft for explicitly gendered reasons. The book’s final documents cover recantations of confessions, the aftermath of the witch hunt, and statements of regret.

New to this edition are records from the trial of Samuel Wardwell, a fortune-teller or "cunning man" whose apparent expertise made him vulnerable to suspicions of witchcraft. The salem witch trials stand as one of the infamous moments in colonial American history.

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